Meats to Smoke and Grill Recipes, Recipes

Smoking a Beef Brisket the Franklin Way

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Brisket is one of the toughest cut of meat to smoke but with long cooking it can be made tender and delicious. Smoking a beef brisket takes about twice as long than any other braising meats because of the connective tissues that need time to break down into a gelatinous state when cooked slowly at low heat.

Smoking a Beef Brisket
Sliced smoked brisket on a wooden cutting board

What makes this recipe so special?

The Aaron Franklin method for smoking brisket has become one of the world’s most beloved barbecue techniques.

Aaron Franklin’s secret to making world-class BBQ is simplicity. Don’t get overwhelmed with complicated rubs or sauces. Instead, rely on a 1:1 ratio of salt/pepper spice mix for an edge that will draw out your meat’s natural flavors while giving it some smokey goodness thanks to pepper alone!

About Brisket

Brisket is a tough, fatty cut of meat that comes from the chest area of a cow. It’s perfect for smoking because the fat helps to keep the meat moist and flavorful. Smoking brisket low and slow is the key to tender, juicy results.

If you’re looking for an authentic Texas-style brisket, this recipe is for you! Smoking a beef brisket using the Aaron Franklin method results in a delicious, juicy brisket that’s perfect for any barbecue occasion.

Smoking a brisket using wagyu beef

Wagyu beef is a type of Japanese breed of cows that is praised for its marbled fat content and intense flavor.

Why should you use wagyu brisket for this recipe?

1. The fat in the wagyu beef will render slowly over the course of the cook, infusing the meat with flavor and tenderizing it.

2. Wagyu beef is also more tender than regular beef, so it will be easier to slice after smoking.

3. Wagyu beef has a higher fat content than regular beef, which helps to keep the meat moist and prevents it from drying out during the smoking process.

Using wagyu for this recipe will results in a flavorful and juicy piece of meat that’s perfect for smoking.

If you can’t find wagyu brisket though, any good quality beef brisket will work for this recipe. Look for a brisket that is well-marbled and has a good amount of fat on the surface. The fat will help protect the meat from drying out during the smoking process.

Wagyu Brisket
Click HERE to buy your wagyu brisket

5 tips to the perfect smoked beef brisket

1 – Choose the right type of beef brisket

When it comes to smoking a beef brisket, quality is key. You want to look for a well-marbled brisket with good fat coverage. This will help ensure that your brisket is juicy and flavorful. The better the quality of your beef, the tastier your final product will be. So don’t skimp on this important ingredient!

2 – Season the brisket with salt and pepper only.

Do not use any other type of seasoning, as this will mask the flavor of the beef.

3 – Stabilize the temperature in your smoker before adding the brisket.

If you place the beef brisket on the smoker before the temperature has stabilized, you run the risk of overcooking or undercooking your meat. This will result in a less than ideal final product. So be patient and wait for the smoker to reach the correct temperature before adding your brisket.

4 – Maintain the cooking temperature throughout the cooking.

If you let the temperature of the smoker fluctuate, you risk overcooking or undercooking your brisket. This will result in a less than ideal final product. So be sure to maintain a consistent cooking temperature throughout the smoking process.

In order to ensure that your brisket is cooked to perfection, it’s important to monitor the internal temperature of the meat throughout the smoking process. We recommend using a digital thermometer for this task.

5 – Allow the brisket to rest for before slicing into it.

If you try to slice into the brisket immediately after smoking it, you’ll end up with dry, tough meat. So be sure to let the brisket rest for at least 30 minutes before slicing into it. This will allow the juices to re-distribute evenly throughout the meat, resulting in a juicier, more flavorful final product.

Smoking a beef brisket is an art form, but following these tips will help you to create a delicious, juicy brisket that’s perfect for any

Smoked Brisket Recipe

Smoking a Beef Brisket: the Aaron Franklin method

Recipe by Thierry @ Grill Culture Course: Meats to Smoke and Grill Recipes, Recipes
Servings

4

servings
Prep time

30

minutes
Cooking time

40

minutes
Calories

300

kcal

Brisket is one of the toughest cut of meat to smoke but with long cooking it can be made tender and delicious. Smoking a beef brisket takes about twice as long than any other braising meats because of the connective tissues that need time to break down into a gelatinous state when cooked slowly at low heat.

Cook Mode

Keep the screen of your device on

Ingredients

  • 9-12 lbs. 9-12 Brisket

  • For the rub:
  • 1/2 cup 1/2 Ground black peppercorn

  • 1/2 cup 1/2 Diamond Crystal Kosher Salt

  • BBQ myst:
  • 1/4 cup 1/4 Worcestershire sauce

  • 1/4 cup 1/4 Water

  • Fuel:
  • Oak or hickory for the smoke

Directions

  • Trim and season the meat
  • Unwrap, rinse meat, and pat dry with a paper towel.
  • On a cutting board, trim excess fat. Leave about 1/4 inch of fat across the flat cap. Try to do it when you’ve just removed it from the refrigerator as the meat will be firmer, which will make it is easier to trim. Not sure how to trim your brisket, click HERE and watch Aaron show you how.
  • Apply the salt & pepper rub all over the brisket moderately.
  • Dry Brine
  • Leave uncovered at room temperature for about an hour, or in your refrigerator if more than an hour. At the most overnight.
  • Set your smoker
  • Following manufacturer’s recommendations, prepare your smoker for indirect smoking, and set the temperature to 225°F. Add oak or hickory wood to the firebox.
  • Smoking Directions
  • Transfer the brisket to the smoker grates and smoke for 6 hours, or until internal temperature has reached 165°F.
  • After approximately six hours, once the internal temperature of the brisket hits around 165°F, the brisket will hit a stage known as the stall. The muscles will start to tighten up, forcing moisture to the surface of the meat, and thus, cooling down the brisket. The key to getting through the stall is to raise the cooking temperature to between 280°F and 285°F, right before the stall. Around 180°F, collagen in the meat will start to break down into gelatin.
  • Cook for approximately 1 hour at this temperature. Lift the brisket and check for stiffness. If it bends at the edges, that’s a sign that you’re through the stall.
  • Remove the brisket from the smoker and leave to rest for about 5 minutes.
  • Spray brisket with Worcestershire & water sauce mister solution.
  • Tightly wrap brisket in pink butcher paper. When you’re ready to wrap, follow Aaron’s step by step instructions, found in our complete guide HERE.
  • Transfer back to smoker. Close lid and leave to cook wrapped in paper for a further 2-3 hours, or until internal temperature reaches 185°F.
  • Finishing Steps
  • Rest the brisket for 1 hour unwrapped.
  • Place on a cutting board Do not remove fat cap.

Equipment

Notes

  • Aaron makes use of a simple rub of salt and pepper in a 1:1 ratio instead of complex BBQ rubs. I recommend using a salt and pepper shaker, which helps get the rub more evenly.
  • It’s important to trim the fat before smoking the brisket, as this will help render the fat and create a delicious, juicy brisket.
  • Brining the beef brisket helps to tenderize the meat and keep it juicy during cooking.
  • Smoking the beef brisket at a higher temperature (285°F) during the stall will help to break down collagen and create a more tender, juicy brisket.
  • Wrapping the beef brisket in butcher paper helps to lock in moisture and flavor.
  • Allow the brisket to rest for at least 30 minutes before slicing, as this will help to keep the juices in the meat.

Storage instructions

You can store your smoked beef brisket in the fridge for up to four days, or in the freezer for up to six months. To reheat, simply slice and reheat in a 350°F oven until warmed through. Enjoy!

Side dishes

Try serving this brisket with some of these side dishes for a complete meal:

Baked beans

Baked beans are a classic side dish that goes great with any type of barbecue. They’re hearty and filling, and their sweetness pairs well with the smoky flavor of the brisket.

Potato salad

A lighter side dish, potato salad is a refreshing option that helps balance out the heaviness of the

Macaroni and cheese

This rich and creamy dish is the perfect comfort food to enjoy with your smoked brisket. The cheesy flavor pairs well with the smokiness of the meat, and it’s sure to be a hit with everyone at the table.

Green beans

Green beans are a healthy option that goes well with any type of barbecue. They’re lightly flavored, so they won’t overpower the taste of the brisket, and they’ll add a pop of color to your plate.

Corn on the cob

Corn on the cob is a summertime favorite that’s perfect for enjoying with smoked beef brisket. The sweetness of the corn pairs well with the smokey flavor of the meat.

Conclusion

Smoking a beef brisket is easy to do with the right method. By trimming the fat, brining the meat, smoking at a higher temperature during the stall, and wrapping in butcher paper, you’ll create a delicious, juicy brisket that’s perfect for any barbecue occasion.

Aaron Franklin MasterClass

Hailed as one of the best Pitmasters in the country, Aaron Franklin is the owner and operator of Franklin Barbecue in Austin, Texas. In his MasterClass course, Aaron walks you through everything you need to know about smoking a beef brisket, from choosing the right cut of meat to wrapping and cooking it. He also shares his tips and tricks for creating a delicious, juicy brisket that’s perfect for any barbecue occasion. Whether you’re a beginner or a pitmaster-in-training, this course is sure to teach you something new about smoking beef brisket.

Click HERE to find out more.

Frequently Asked Questions

What is the best wood to use for smoking a beef brisket?

Oak or hickory wood is the best to use for smoking a beef brisket.

How long does it take to smoke a beef brisket?

It depends on the weight of your brisket, but it will generally take between 8 and 10 hours to smoke a beef brisket. If you’re using a smaller brisket, it may only take 6 hours.

What is the stall?

The stall is when the internal temperature of the brisket stops rising and stalls at around 165°F.

How do I get through the stall?

The key to getting through the stall is to raise the cooking temperature to between 280°F and 285°F, right before the stall. Around 180°F, collagen in the meat will start to break down into gelatin. Cook for approximately 1 hour at this temperature. Lift the brisket and check for stiffness. If it bends at the edges, that’s a sign that you’re through the stall.

Why do I need to wrap my beef brisket in butcher paper?

Wrapping the beef brisket in butcher paper helps to lock in moisture and flavor.

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